An Extraordinary Advocacy Of Animal Rights

“In the Vegan Manifesto, Sue Coe, human champion of rights for those whose voice most humans do not hear, has crafted a masterpiece: at once visually stunning and spiritually invigorating.”Dr. Michael Greger, author of How Not to Die Sue Coe is the most important and prolific political artist of our time. Her work explores and exposes every form of injustice suffered by both humans and nonhumans. With respect to the latter, her incisive eye-both trenchant and gentle-lays bare the profound immorality of animal exploitation and constitutes a clarion call to us all to reject it. Coe understands that the moral status of animals requires that we go vegan and no one who looks at the stunning work in this book will be able to disagree.”Gary L. Francione, Distinguished Professor of Law and Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Scholar of Law and Philosophy, Rutgers School of Law. Sue Coe also garners impressive accolades from distinguished figures in the world of graphic design, including art directors, Robert Priest and Robert Newman, and political caricaturist, Steve Brodner. Plus, Life Elsewhere creator and host, Norman B says, Sue Coe’s extraordinarily powerful work has intrigued me since my art school days! What a treat to be able to welcome her to the program.” Sue Coe joins Norman B for the next edition to talk about The Animals’ Vegan Manifesto.

We are very pleased to announce that Life Elsewhere will now be aired on Cornucopia Radio run by an enterprising and enthusiastic bunch over in the UK.

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on I R N

You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

The Curious Hidden World Of Felines

“Billy, my cross-eyed Siamese cat had an unusual habit. Before he would settle in to enjoy a nice meal of whatever ridiculously expensive gourmet cat food I provided, he would clamber up to the top of a dresser in my bedroom. Once perched on top, he would skillfully reach down with a paw and open the top draw. Then, he would peek inside and carefully snatch hold of a pair of my underpants. Once secured on his claws, he would transfer the garment to his mouth. From there, he would almost bounce down from his perch and head for his food dish with Marks & Spencer’s* finest dangling from his clenched teeth. When he arrived at said dish, he would carefully arrange my undies around the edge and finally proceed to eat, with what I hope was a satisfied glint in his sadly misaligned eyes. This is a story I couldn’t wait to share with Thomas McNamee.” Says Norman B. It makes perfect sense, after all, McNamee is the author of The Inner Life of Cats – The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions. With a naturalist’s eye combined with humor and a warm heart, Thomas brings the always wild, yet domesticated cat into delightful and insightful focus. Thomas McNamee joins Norman B for the next edition of Life Elsewhere to talk about his definitive book on the hidden world of felines and hopefully explain the curious antics of Billy, the cross-eyed Siamese cat.

*Marks & Spencer explained

We are very pleased to announce that Life Elsewhere will now be aired on Cornucopia Radio run by an enterprising and enthusiastic bunch over in the UK.

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on I R N

You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

American Catch. Whisk(e)y Distilled. Cork Dork.

                          

The U.S. has access to 94,000 miles of coastline, and nearly half the population lives less than ten miles from the sea. Yet 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad. In contrast, a third of all the fish and shellfish we catch are sold to foreign countries. What is keeping us from eating from our local waters? Norman B interviews New York Times best-selling author Paul Greenberg who’s new book  American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood examines the logic-defying problem with American seafood consumption. Greenberg deftly explores three quintessential American seafoods: The New York oyster, the Gulf shrimp, and the Alaskan sockeye salmon. We may believe that we are what we eat, but Greenberg argues that we do not eat what we truly are. We are an ocean nation, the author says, yet we eat a minimal amount of seafood in comparison to meat and poultry. Study after study has touted the benefits of a diet rich in omega-3s from fish, and we have access to a wealth of nutritious, local food options, but we opt out.

Whisk(e)y is in the midst of a huge renaissance. Ten years ago, the United States housed sixty-nine craft distillers; today, there are more than four hundred. Exports of Scotch whisky grew 12 percent just last year. Sales are skyrocketing, and specialty bars are popping up around the country, from New York City to Chicago to Houston. Whisk(e)y expert Heather Greeneauthor of Whisk(e)y Distilled: A Populist Guide to the Water of Life will explain to Norman B, (who admits to being a novice) the mysteries of Whisk(e)y, the crucial importance of “nosing” Whisk(e)y and the spelling.

Professional journalist and amateur drinker Bianca Bosker didn’t know much about wine until she discovered an alternate universe where taste reigns supreme, a world of elite sommeliers who dedicate their lives to the pursuit of flavor. Astounded by their fervor and seemingly superhuman sensory powers, she set out to uncover what drove their obsession and whether she, too, could become a “cork dork.She visits underground tasting groups, exclusive New York City restaurants, California mass-market wine factories, and even a neuroscientist’s fMRI machine as she attempts to answer the most nagging question of all: What’s the big deal about wine? Bianca Bosker joins Norman B to talk about her new book Cork Dork – A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste.

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on I R N

You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Two Women, Writing From Experience?

Siv Jakobsen first made an appearance on Life Elsewhere in the summer of 2015. At that time, Norman B predicted we would be hearing more from, “An artist who displays a maturity, way beyond her years.”  Siv is back with a new single, a wonderful primer for her forthcoming album, expected later this year. All the enthusiastic accolades we heaped upon the Oslo-based singer-songwriter two years ago are proven again with Like I Used To. This time, Siv confidently begins the song unaccompanied. Not an easy task for even the most seasoned of performers. Her distinctive voice effectively takes hold of the listener’s attention as she unfolds a tale of unrequited love. Siv’s plaintive singing and lyrics promise that her as yet unnamed album will be one of the most anticipated releases this year. In the next edition of Life ElsewhereSiv Jakobsen joins Norman B to talk about her new single and her upcoming album, but, will she let us know if her songs are written from experience?

Diana Kirk does not keep us guessing if she is writing from experience. In fact, the Portland, Oregon-based writer is deliberately provocative, “This book is a memoir. Ish, So, it’s all totally true. Kinda. Except for the parts that aren’t.” She says with an impish smile. Her book Licking Flames, Tales Of A Half-Assed Hussy has been called, “Sexy, raw and funny,” and “Like listening to Courtney Love sing My Way.  Diana Kirk has written unapologetically brash essays on sex, drugs, and travel. She spins stories of her imperious teen years, bodacious exploits as a young adult and prickly tales of a grown woman who makes and breaks rules. Norman B will interview Diana with one finger hovering over the seven-second delay button, next on Life Elsewhere.

Plus, Hugh, the London-based group we continue to rave about have a new release. It’s a cover, a medley of Roxette’s It Must’ve Been Love and Monsta Boy’s I’m Sorry. Hear it first at Life Elsewhere!

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on I R N

You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

A Bonkers Climate, Weird Politics & An Honest Memoir

“Never before in the history of the human species has climate set so many spine-chilling new records as last year, 2016.” The opening line from the latest commentary in Counterpunch by Robert Hunziker. The environmental journalist and frequent contributor to Life Elsewhere goes on to liken the Trump administration’s behavior and policies to America’s 19th century frontier mentality, which helped to shape democracy in the first place, has come back to overturn democracy and dictate climatic upheaval and destruction with its concomitant sharp turn away from democratic spirits in favor of a return to Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, circa 1881. Robert Hunziker returns to Life Elsewhere to once again to urge us to take very serious note of Record Setting Climate Going Bonkers.

From Lawmaker To Lawbreaker could be the alternate title of Trey Radel’s tell-all book, Democrazy: A True Story Of Weird Politics, Money, Madness, & Finger Food. The former Republican congressman, once a rising star of the GOP, resigned after being convicted of buying cocaine. “You may wonder how a sitting U.S. Congressman, husband, and father, ended up on the wrong side of a cocaine bust?” Radel writes. Make sure you don’t miss the next edition of Life Elsewhere to hear Trey Radel unravel his true, weird story of politics, money madness and yes, finger food.

Her advice column is read daily by millions, but Amy Dickinson truly was surprised when one of her unusually sardonic responses went viral. Amy uses the example of the much-discussed dialogue on a parent’s distress over their son’s homosexuality to explain how she wants to be herself with her column. And, being herself, is the rāzôn ˈdetre of her new book, Strangers Tend to Tell me Things: A Memoir Of Love, Loss, & Coming Home. Her writing is touching and honest and at times laugh-out-loud funny. Amy poignantly recounts serious moments: “Immediately after my mother’s death, my primary feeling was one of relief.” And, the lighter topics with equal dexterity: “Women of a certain age divide our definition of handsome men into two categories: Ed Harris or Sam Shepard.” Amy Dickinson chats with Norman B in the next edition Life Elsewhere.

STOP PRESS! As we were wrapping this edition of Life Elsewhere, we received the new single, Like I Used To. by the brilliant Oslo-based musician, Siv Jakobsen. With literally almost no time left to spare, we managed to squeeze in Siv’s emotively tender song. Make sure you do not miss Siv Jakobsen’s first release from her forthcoming album.

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on I R N

You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud