Category Archives: Paul Greenberg

You Cannot Open A Book Without Learning Something*

The last Saturday in April is Independent Bookstore Day. In a world of tweets and algorithms and pageless digital downloads, bookstores are not a dying anachronism. They are living, breathing organisms that continue to grow and expand. In fact, there are more of them this year than there were last year. Take a look at the photo above, it shows just a small selection of wonderful books we have talked about at Life Elsewhere. If you overlooked any of them. we encourage you to pop into your local independent bookstore and search them out. While you are there, help us a little and mention you heard about the book on Life Elsewhere.
*Confucius wrote our headline.

We are very pleased to announce that Life Elsewhere can now be heard on Cornucopia Radio

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on I R N

You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

American Catch. Whisk(e)y Distilled. Cork Dork.

                          

The U.S. has access to 94,000 miles of coastline, and nearly half the population lives less than ten miles from the sea. Yet 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad. In contrast, a third of all the fish and shellfish we catch are sold to foreign countries. What is keeping us from eating from our local waters? Norman B interviews New York Times best-selling author Paul Greenberg who’s new book  American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood examines the logic-defying problem with American seafood consumption. Greenberg deftly explores three quintessential American seafoods: The New York oyster, the Gulf shrimp, and the Alaskan sockeye salmon. We may believe that we are what we eat, but Greenberg argues that we do not eat what we truly are. We are an ocean nation, the author says, yet we eat a minimal amount of seafood in comparison to meat and poultry. Study after study has touted the benefits of a diet rich in omega-3s from fish, and we have access to a wealth of nutritious, local food options, but we opt out.

Whisk(e)y is in the midst of a huge renaissance. Ten years ago, the United States housed sixty-nine craft distillers; today, there are more than four hundred. Exports of Scotch whisky grew 12 percent just last year. Sales are skyrocketing, and specialty bars are popping up around the country, from New York City to Chicago to Houston. Whisk(e)y expert Heather Greeneauthor of Whisk(e)y Distilled: A Populist Guide to the Water of Life will explain to Norman B, (who admits to being a novice) the mysteries of Whisk(e)y, the crucial importance of “nosing” Whisk(e)y and the spelling.

Professional journalist and amateur drinker Bianca Bosker didn’t know much about wine until she discovered an alternate universe where taste reigns supreme, a world of elite sommeliers who dedicate their lives to the pursuit of flavor. Astounded by their fervor and seemingly superhuman sensory powers, she set out to uncover what drove their obsession and whether she, too, could become a “cork dork.She visits underground tasting groups, exclusive New York City restaurants, California mass-market wine factories, and even a neuroscientist’s fMRI machine as she attempts to answer the most nagging question of all: What’s the big deal about wine? Bianca Bosker joins Norman B to talk about her new book Cork Dork – A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste.

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on I R N

You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

The Authors, The Books, The Interviews

                 

           

          

           

           

           

Books are an integral part of Life Elsewhere. All kinds of books: the imaginative, off-kilter novel; the gripping detective drama; the investigative documentary; the revealing autobiography; the anecdotal memoir; the unapologetic satire…every type of book is welcome. There’s just one stipulation, Life Elsewhere host, Norman B has to read the book first before he talks about it on air. Which explains why his insightful, conversational interviews are praised by authors and listeners alike.

Above are just some of the books and authors featured in the past year on Life Elsewhere. See if you can match the author’s photograph with their book?

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  
Mondays 7.00pm ET at WROM Radio
Mondays 5.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio

Life ELsewhere Podcast With Paul Greenberg & Alan Connor Available Now

Two fascinating interviews with two authors of two very different books, The Hit That Never Was and a bonus music track

Paul GreenbergPaul Greenberg is the author of the New York Times bestseller Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food.He joins Life Elsewhere to talk about his latest book, American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood. The book explores why the United States, the country that controls more ocean than any nation on earth imports 90 percent of its seafood from abroad. Greenberg deftly explores three quintessential American seafoods: The New York oyster, the Gulf shrimp and the Alaskan sockeye salmon. We may believe that we are what we eat, but Greenberg argues that we do not eat what we truly are. We are an ocean nation, the author says, yet we eat a minimal amount of seafood in comparison to meat and poultry. Study after study has touted the benefits of a diet rich in omega-3s from fish, and we have access to a wealth of nutritious, local food options, but we opt out.

Alan Connor is a comedy writer, television presenter, quizmaster and author. He writesAlan Connor a weekly column for The Guardian on crosswords and writes for the BBC on languages and arts. Connor’s obvious passion for the ubiquitous puzzle, led him to write about its fascinating history in his new book, The Crossword Century: 100 Years of Witty Wordplay, Ingenious Puzzles, and Linguistic Mischief . He chronicles every twist and turn from the 1920′s, when crosswords were considered to be a menace to productive society, to World War II, when they were used to recruit code breakers, to their starring role in a 2008 episode of The Simpsons.  He describes the colorful characters who make up the interesting and often bizarre subculture of crossword constructors and competitive solvers. He gives us the A-list names of some of the more well-known among the puzzle solvers, may surprise you. Connor even explains how your character is revealed by the implement you use.

Also in this edition of Life Elsewhere, the Hit That Never Was, featuring Only Real with Cadillac Girl, selected by a listener named Scott. You too can get your Hit That Never Was played on Life Elsewhere by sending your suggestion to hitthatneverwas at lifeelsewhere dot co. With a critical eye on the latest developments in Israel and Gaza, Norman B decided to play an uplifting piece of music from Riff Cohen, a sing-songwriter, actress and musician who was born in Tel Aviv, to a Tunisian father and an Algerian-French mother. Riff performs in Hebrew and French and in her single A Paris, she happily touts the pleasure of her adopted home.

Download the Podcast

Life Elsewhere airs every Monday at 9.00am ET

WMNF 88.5fm

www.wmnf.org

 

 

American Catch & The Crosswords Century

 

Next on Life Elsewhere two authors talk about their fascinating must-read books

The U.S. has access to 94,000 miles of coastline, and nearly half the population lives less than ten miles from the sea. Yet 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad. In contrast, a third of all the fish and shellfish we catch are sold to foreign countries. What is keeping us from eating from our local waters?

Norman B interviews New York Times best-selling author Paul Greenberg who’s new book  American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood examines the logic-defying problem with American seafood consumption. Greenberg deftly explores three quintessential American seafoods: The New York oyster, the Gulf shrimp and the Alaskan sockeye salmon. We may believe that we are what we eat, but Greenberg argues that we do not eat what we truly are. We are an ocean nation, the author says, yet we eat a minimal amount of seafood in comparison to meat and poultry. Study after study has touted the benefits of a diet rich in omega-3s from fish, and we have access to a wealth of nutritious, local food options, but we opt out.

 

London-based author, journalist, television producer and academic Alan Connor, writes a bi-weekly column for The Guardian on crosswords. Connor’s obvious passion for the ubiquitous puzzle, led him to write about its fascinating history. He chronicles every twist and turn from the 1920’s, when crosswords were considered to be a menace to productive society, to World War II, when they were used to recruit code breakers, to their starring role in a 2008 episode of The Simpsons.  

Alan Connor joins Life Elsewhere and Norman B to talk about his new book, The Crossword Century: 100 Years of Witty Wordplay, Ingenious Puzzles, and Linguistic Mischief. You’ll hear about the colorful characters who make up the interesting and often bizarre subculture of crossword constructors and competitive solvers. The A-list names of some of the more well-known among the puzzle solvers may surprise you. Connor even explains how your character is revealed by the implement you use.

Life Elsewhere airs every Monday

9.00am ET (1400 GMT) 

WMNF 88.5fm

streaming at www.wmnf.org

Podcast