Category Archives: Pop Grenade

From Public Enemy to Pussy Riot

In the next edition of Life Elsewhere, “Protest Music” from: Public Enemy | 3 Phase Featuring Dr Motte | Spiral Tribe | Boney M | Replikas | Pussy Riot | Kendrick Lamar

Yes, Boney M are included in the list of “Protest Music”! Find out why and how when we talk with Matthew Collin about his new book, Pop Grenade: From Public Enemy to Pussy Riot – Dispatches from Musical FrontlinesWe asked Matthew“Where have all the protest songs gone?”  He responded, “If you ask that question, then you haven’t been listening to the right stuff”. He writes that music is still a vital form of resistance in these latter days of Capitalism. He begins his book with the raw political force of Public Enemy at their height, moving next to the ultimately tragic arc of the Love Parade in Berlin. From there, he accompanies a group of techno renegades as they travel central Europe, visiting the war-torn Balkans to inject some humanity into a hell-scape. Next he stops is the slightly surreal era of Saakashvili’s Georgia who enlists the help of Boney M to regain the rebellious states of South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Collin journeys to tear-gas clouded Gezi Park, as the Turks push back against Erdoğan and a swelling religio-neoliberalism. Finally, he heads to Moscow, to get a feel for Putin’s Russia after more than a decade of control, and the nascent push-back by the likes of Pussy Riot and others.

His book is a fascinating read, because he writes from experience, documenting a mixture of the personal and the journalistic, interspersed with historical allusions and slices of local flavour. Matthew Collin will join Norman B in the next edition of Life Elsewhere to talk about his engaging book and answer, “Where have all the protest songs gone?”

Life Elsewhere airs every Sunday at 12 noon ET on The Source WMNF HD3 and Mondays at 5.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio

Where Have All The Protest Songs Gone?

Recently we asked, “Where have all the protest songs gone?” Matthew Collin in his new book, Pop Grenade: From Public Enemy to Pussy Riot – Dispatches from Musical Frontlines, may have the answer. Moreover, Collin, suggests if you ask that question, then you haven’t been listening to the right stuff. He writes that music is still a vital form of resistance in these latter days of Capitalism. He begins his book with the raw political force of Public Enemy at their height, moving next to the ultimately tragic arc of the Love Parade in Berlin. From there, he accompanies a group of techno renegades as they travel central Europe, visiting the war-torn Balkans to inject some humanity into a hell-scape. Next he stops is the slightly surreal era of Saakashvili’s Georgia who enlists the help of Boney M to regain the rebellious states of South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Collin journeys to tear-gas clouded Gezi Park, as the Turks push back against Erdoğan and a swelling religio-neoliberalism. Finally, he heads to Moscow, to get a feel for Putin’s Russia after more than a decade of control, and the nascent push-back by the likes of Pussy Riot and others.

His book is a fascinating read, because he writes from experience, documenting a mixture of the personal and the journalistic, interspersed with historical allusions and slices of local flavour. Matthew Collin will join Norman B in an upcoming edition of Life Elsewhere to talk about his engaging book and answer, “Where have all the protest songs gone?”

Life Elsewhere airs every Sunday at 12 noon ET on The Source WMNF HD3 and Mondays at 5.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio

Making Sense Of The UK Election Results

No pollster, no pundit, no political leader saw it coming – not even Prime Minister, David Cameron himself. Only once before in recent history has an incumbent government increased its majority – and that was Mrs Thatcher in her prime in the 1980s.

The United Kingdom general election of 2015 was held on 7 May 2015 to elect the 56th Parliament of the United Kingdom. Voting took place in all 650 parliamentary constituencies of the United Kingdom, each electing one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons, the lower house of Parliament. Local elections took place in most of England on the same day, excluding Greater London. It was the first general election to be held at the end of a fixed term parliament following the enactment of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011. The election campaign was overshadowed by speculation that the outcome would be too close to call and would result in another hung parliament, similar to the aftermath of the 2010 general election. This led to many pollsters and media commentators dubbing the election the most unpredictable for decades. Opinion polls were eventually proven to have drastically underestimated the Conservative vote, which bore similarity to their surprise victory in the general election of 1992. The incumbent Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron, having governed since 2010 in a coalition with the Liberal Democrats, was elected for a second term with 36.9% of the vote and 331 seats.

Peter James

But what does the outcome mean to the rest of the world? How do we fathom the almost Monty Pythonesque array of parties, including the “Respect Party” led the ubiquitous George Galloway? To help us make sense of politics in Blighty, noted crime-writer and keen social observer, Peter James will join the program to explain the anomalies of UK government and politics.

Life Elsewhere airs every Sunday at 12 noon ET on The Source WMNF HD3 and Mondays at 5.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio