Tag Archives: podcast

A Private Conversation With Amy Rigby

 

Amy Rigby has been crisscrossing the USA promoting her memoir, Girl To City, stopping at music venues and book stores from upstate New York to the Pacific North West. She reads from her book, often she plays her guitar, sometimes she is accompanied by musician friends.  The acclaimed singer-songwriter loves the experience as evident by her enthusiastic social media and diary posts. Of course, not all of Amy’s fans have been able to enjoy her personal appearances, which is why we are delighted she took the time to talk with Norman B about Girl To City.

Amy Rigby, Girl To City – A Memoir – Summer Of My Wasted Youth

When I lived on East 4th Street, the staircase had been clogged twice a month with tenants waiting for the mailman to bring disability and welfare checks. My 14th Street neighbors were more of a mix of writers and musicians, the employed and the unemployable. Above and below and on either side of me, people were reading books, painting, making clothes. I also saw a lot of them hustling to the subway or bus in the morning dressed in business attire, off to do their day jobs. I won’t be like that, I thought. I’m only tempting until I’m successful at music. Then I won’t have to work another job.

In this short, brilliantly written example from Amy Rigby’s memoir, you cannot ignore her raw honesty. Even describing humdrum, day-to-day scenarios she doesn’t wander off into fanciful wordplay. Instead, Amy has a marvelous knack for not only conjuring up the scene but also her feelings at that moment. It’s a powerful skill, she modestly acknowledges. “I write better than I say it.” She announces with a slight giggle. Conversing with Amy is always a treat because you never know what tangent you’ll go in. Reading Girl To City is not unlike having a private conversation with the much-loved artist. She speaks directly to you, sometimes wistfully:

He wore a tank top in winter and summer.
But I loved him.
He gave me a crash course in art and film history.
He also gave me crabs, gonorrhea and herpes.
But I loved him.

And she always speaks with a wink in her eye. Never jaded, often knowing and occasionally with a tartness that catches the reader by surprise. Her memoir is packed full of information, details, names, cultural references, a history of rock and roll as seen through Amy’s almost always bright-eyed vision. There have been a lot of memoirs from the rock fraternity, Girl To City deserves its own unique category, as Lenny Kaye says, “Amy Rigby writes the way she performs and sings, laced with insight, humor, self-awareness, and above all, heart”.

During the conversation, Norman B asked Amy to select some music to play during the show. She decided on two cuts from A One Way Ticket To My Life, a companion album to her book, Girl To City, featuring unreleased tracks and demos. Plus she requested we play, the Summer Of My Wasted Youth from her 1998 album, Middlescence.

Show #351

Graphic Design In The Age Of Unrest – Redux

As the Midterm Election Day progressed social media was very much alive and well with almost everyone it seemed rushing to let the rest of us know what they had been doing mere moments before by posting selfies with “I Voted!” stickers, front and center. If you were not already sure how our world has changed in the age of Trump, then the cacophony of “I Voted!” stickers should have convinced you. The omnipresent stickers came in never-ending varieties, from the generic to the overtly partisan and the downright ornery, “I Voted – Have You?” No matter if we accept or not, that all of these tiny, little graphic messages were designed. Someone somewhere produced artwork that had to be sent to a printer. A perfect example of graphic design being used to make a point, to get a message across. Which is exactly what graphic design is meant to do. These miniature statements in mostly red, white and blue may not be the pinnacle of brilliant graphic design but they initiated a discussion on graphic design in times of unrest.  Acclaimed New York-based creative director, Robert Newman suggests the anonymously-designed “I Voted!” stickers are not too far removed from the bold, unforgettable graphics of Emory Douglas for Black Panthers in the ’60s. He adds, “In times of unrest, graphic designers always shine.”

Robert Newman discusses graphic design in the age of unrest on our next edition. Below are links to many of the graphics we mention in the show and illustrated above.

Edsel Rodriguez

Black Lives Matter

Home Made Graphics

Act Up

Gun Control

Feminist Graphic Design

Afropunk

Pink Pussy Hat

Trump Magazine Covers

Show #338 Vs 2

Dispelling The Myths Of Thomas Cromwell – Redux

After a decade of researching the Royal Archives, the award-winning and New York Times bestselling author, Diarmaid MacCulloch has emerged with the most thoroughly researched and complete biography of Thomas Crowell – a polarizing political figure most know for his unwavering service to volatile King Henry VIII, the demise of Anne Boleyn, and his hand in the Reformation. Thomas Cromwell: A Revolutionary Life sheds light onto a fascinating part of history, one that helped shape the course of English politics and the future of the Protestant religion. Since Crowell’s life met its end on the scaffold in 1540, history has not been kind to this self-made commoner who rose from obscurity to become the architect of England’s split with Rome. However, MacCulloch unveils a more sympathetic figure. Was Cromwell the villain of history or the victim of its creation? A masterful storyteller, not afraid to interject a healthy portion of English wit, MacCulloch dispels popular myths. Despite being unable to control the violent humor of his King, Cromwell made his mark on England, setting her on a path to religious awakening and indelibly transforming the system of government of the English-speaking world. Norman B’s conversation with Diarmaid MacCulloch is certainly not for history buffs alone, as illustrated by the author’s deadpan reference to the current US President’s possible resemblance to the one-time narcissistic, volatile ruler of England.

Show #338 V1

Reggae + Passion = Brighton

Brighton is a seaside resort on the south coast of England, located 47 miles south of London. Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Rome and Anglo-Saxon periods. The area underwent various stages of development throughout the centuries, eventually becoming a fashionable seaside resort in the Georgian era, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV. With the arrival of railways in 1847, Brighton became a popular destination for day-trippers from London. The town continued to grow in the 20th century and become renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, arts and music scenes. Perfect then, for the home-base of Roots Garden which began storming Brighton’s club night scene in 1995 by presenting authentic Reggae sound system culture. Roots Garden’s passion and dedication to representing the very best of Reggae music and its many branches have secured its name as an integral part of Brighton’s musical landscape. Established in 2005, Roots Garden Records represents many of the talented artists, musicians and producers had been club favorites over the years. Working closely alongside pioneering UK Dub/Reggae Producer, Nick Manasseh, the label has released music with the cream of the crop of Jamaican and British artists and musicians including, Johnny Osbourne, Earl 16, Cate Ferris, Luciano, Danny Red, Johnny Clarke, Richie Phoe, Dark Angel, Jah Mali, Brother Culture, Vin Gordon, Freddie McGregor, Josey Wales, Bob Skeng, and Tiawa and more.

Nick Manasseh & Tiawa in the studio

In the next edition of Life Elsewhere we welcome Roots Garden label honcho, Jon Jones, Reggae Producer, Nick Manasseh, and upcoming singer-songwriter, Tiawa. The trio select exemplary cuts from their label – Earl 16, Vin Gordon, Danny Red, Cate Ferris, and Tiawa. Make sure you listen carefully to Tiawa talk about her new release, Pain Killa. “People think it’s about love…a love song. It’s not a love song!” She insists. “It’s about dealing with the world we live in.” We were already bowled over with Tiawa’s superb recording, and Nick’s creative production, now after hearing her impassioned explanation we are raving. Our conversation with Jon, Nick, and Tiawa explores their passion for Reggae, how Roots Garden came about, making Reggae music, and why they love Brighton.

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Show #333

Bob Ross. Binoy Kampmark. Monica L Smith. Verdigrls.

Bob Ross on Avengers: Endgame

“I’m not interested in seeing, Avengers: Endgame!” Says the usually moderately-toned, Bob Ross, who then launches into an atypical commentary on the reasons why he believes Superstar-packed, mega-movies are a symptom of the fake news era. “There’s a lot of mass psychosis going on in the country today. People do not want to deal with reality. So they have become affixed in the Marvel universe. I find more interesting things in my universe, commonly know as reality!” He continues, “You know this whole thing about what’s true and what’s possible is no longer part of our process.”

Monica L. Smith on Cities – The First 6,000 Years

Today, more than half the world’s population lives in cities, and it’s predicted that by 2030, 60% of the population of China, 87% of Americans, and 92% in the United Kingdom will be city dwellers. Yet urban inhabitation is a relatively new phenomenon in the timeline of human history. The first cities came into being about 6,000 years ago. Yet. The creation of cities was not an inevitability, so why did it happen? Monica L. Smith, professor of anthropology at UCLA, discusses her new, fascinating book.

Binoy Kampmark on Julian Assange

Belmarsh Prison

A frequent contributor to Life Elsewhere, Dr. Binoy Kampmark recently wrote a piece for Counterpunch titled, Julian Assange As Neurosis. The very mention of Assange and Wikileaks immediately generates polarized opinions. And, without fail, Binoy’s take on most subjects always trigger animated responses. With Assange being unceremoniously removed from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London to Belmarsh prison, (known as the UK equivalent of Guantanamo), and his possible extradition to the US, the outpouring of response from all quarters has been intense. Dr. Kampmark knows Assange and the Wikileaks story better than most, he ran on the Wikileaks ticket in the 2013 Australian elections.

Verdigrls

Catherine Wolk, Anna Wolk, and Rachel Rossen perform under the moniker, Verdigrls. They are out of Brooklyn, NY, and their new EP is titled Small Moves. The track you’ll hear is Daylight Savings. And we happen to think Verdigrls deserve your attention.

 

 

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

If you miss any editions of Life Elsewhere, go here then go to the Listen On-Demand panel, choose the date of a show and click play.

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Show #321

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