Tag Archives: Poetry

Life Elsewhere Music Vol 244 – A Conversation With Anika Pyle

No one can really tell you how it feels. How you will be affected. Grief is immeasurable. Singer-songwriter and spoken word artist, Anika Pyle has bravely produced an album reflecting on the passing of her father. Although she admits it was cathartic, she explains recalling her albeit brief moments with her dad are ever-changing, as her memory plays tricks with reality. Yet, when Anika shares this description of her dad, you know it’s real, “He had long hair. He always had long hair, except for a couple of times when he had to go to court. He was a handsome man”. That is the voice of a daughter, a woman grappling with the loss of a parent.  In Wild River, Anika’s most recent LP she tries to make sense of her father’s sudden death to an overdose. “It’s about loss in general.” She writes,  adding, “We’ve all lost so much this past year – loved ones, jobs, houses, in many ways life as we knew it. By the time the pandemic hit, I was already deep into a grieving process and learned you can’t stubbornly resist a wild, unpredictable, uncontrollable river, no matter how desperately you battle the current.” The honesty of Anika’s words and music caught our attention. A Zoom conversation was arranged, Anika dressed in black, looked photo-shoot-ready as she spoke earnestly into the camera. Her thoughtful responses to questions were bolstered by her natural ability to smile and laugh. Listen carefully, we believe you’ll agree, Anika Pyle is a talent who deserves your attention.  

LEM Vol 244

Tales Retold From A Remarkable Culture

 

They are rich, extraordinary tales from ancient Inuit culture that tell of remarkable northern vistas, unfamiliar narratives, strange gods, and unforgettable characters where women can marry dogs, birds beat their wings so hard they create a storm, an old woman turns into a man, and a woman kills her daughter to take her place for a man’s affections and wears her daughter’s skin as a disguise. Poet, Richard Price has respectfully, (lovingly perhaps) taken three Inuit stories and retold them with a sensitive, yet earnest approach in his new book, The Owner Of The Sea. The London-based Price, also the lyricist and vocalist for The Loss Adjusters has embarked on what he considers a formidable endeavor by interpreting venerated tales from a remarkable culture. Richard is proud of his work, the time, and the effort he has spent in creating this book, but he admits to being apprehensive of the Inuit people’s response. “I hope I get their approval and know I’m in awe of their stories”, he says. During our conversation with Richard Price, he reads from his book, this is a treat. His original Scottish rouge comes to the fore in full effect. He brings the characters to life, they become believable, even though they engage in mystical and un-human-like behavior. These are strange stories, originally told as lessons or guidance, not unlike the more obvious religious books. Richard explains his love of poetry was inspired by music, “Sam Cooke and Bob Dylan” he announces spiritedly. The Owner Of The Sea is a perfect example of the man’s love of words, of language, of the enchanting stories of the Inuit people. 

Show 433

Poetry. It’s the Ultimate Freedom

Richard Price says, “When you call someone a poet, it’s like a praise word.” Price has a lot of thoughts about poetry and music and religion and life and, well…Richard is after all poet. He is also one-third of The Loss Adjusters. Their single, The World Brims came to Norman B’s attention a few weeks back. “It’s a fantastic piece of mesmerizing music,” the Life Elsewhere host says, “I couldn’t stop playing it non-stop. Then I wanted to know more. Who was behind it? We reached out and discovered the lyrics and vocals were by Richard Price.” The erudite Scotsman was invited onto the show to talk about his music and his poetry, but the conversation covered so much more. Price recalls how he was originally influenced by songwriters like Bob Dylan, Neil Young and, Leonard Cohen. Poetry, he says is a kind of urgency in writing. “One of the most important things about that blank page is I can write anything on there. It’s the ultimate privacy. It’s the ultimate freedom. To be able to control that blank space with something you have made. To shut out all the noises, the sorrows, and the anxieties”. On politics and poetry, Richard Price suggests, “Poetry allows you to think slowly and carefully, a lot of the political environment now, is about not thinking.” And, when considering lyrics set to music, he tells fellow Loss Adjuster, Roberto, “He can do whatever he wants with my words, he can mix them in, erase them, change them, I want the whole experience!” Richard is an intriguing conversationalist, a mind of splendid ideas. Make sure you do not miss the next edition of Life Elsewhere.

Richard Price recommends Poetry Magazine. And we recommend you visit Richard’s site, Hydro Hotel 

 

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
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Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

If you miss any editions of Life Elsewhere, go here then go to the Listen On-Demand panel, choose the date of a show and click play.

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

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