Tag Archives: The Source WMNF HD3

Behind The Glitz, The Glamour, & The Factory

             
Laurence Leamer – Capote’s Women – A True Story of Love, Betrayal, and a Swan Song for An Era 

“There are certain women,” Truman Capote wrote, “who, though perhaps not born rich, are born to be rich.” Barbara “Babe” Paley, Gloria Guinness, Marella Agnelli, Slim Hayward, Pamela Churchill, C. Z. Guest, Lee Radziwill (Jackie Kennedy’s sister)—they were the toast of midcentury New York, each beautiful and distinguished in her own way. Capote befriended them, received their deepest confidences, and ingratiated himself into their lives. Then, in one fell swoop, he betrayed them in the most surprising and startling way possible. Following the acclaimed publication of Breakfast at Tiffany’s in 1958 and In Cold Blood in 1966, when Capote struggled with a crippling case of writer’s block. While en­joying all the fruits of his success, he was struck with an idea for what he was sure would be his most celebrated novel…one based on the re­markable, racy lives of his very, very rich friends. For years, Capote attempted to write An­swered Prayers, what he believed would have been his magnum opus. But when he eventually published a few chapters in Esquire, the thinly fictionalized lives (and scandals) of his closest fe­male confidantes were laid bare for all to see, and he was banished from their high-society world forever. Laurence Leamer joins Norman B to talk about, Capote’s Women.

Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni – After Andy – Adventures In Warhol Land  

She was the last person to be hired at Andy Warhol’s Factory and she has written a book about her experiences. Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni doesn’t mind divulging she had an affair with Mick Jagger when she was a seventeen-year-old school girl. Ms. Fraser-Cavassoni isn’t one to hold back, in her new book, After Andy – Adventures In Warhol Land, she tells all. It’s a glitzy, fast-paced, juicy, gossipy, name-dropping chronicle. She saw firsthand the end of an era and the establishment of a global phenomenon. From behind the scenes disagreements and the assessment of his estate, which included Interview magazine and his art inventory, to the record-breaking auction of his belongings and the publication of his diaries. Natasha examines the immediate aftermath of Warhol’s death and his ever-growing impact. Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni chats with Norman B about her riveting eyewitness memoir.

Robin Guthrie – Mockingbird Love EP

It is 39 years on from Cocteau Twins‘ revered debut release, Garlands, now Robin Guthrie gives us, Mockingbird Love EP. This is the first new music from Guthrie since the Another Flower album with the late Harold Budd, released just days before Budd’s passing in December 2020. About his new work, Robin Guthrie says, “Of late I’ve been very focused on my instrumental music, which is increasingly an intense endeavor, all the more so as I don’t really share it with anyone. So here I am, finally, with some words about my next releases. ‘Mockingbird Love’, a four-track EP, is the first small collection of music that I have felt comfortable to release for a while. This is my October.” 

(Eli)Zabeth Owens – Knock, Knock LP

The always astute Nancy Kells of Grimalkin Records alerted us to the music of (Eli)Zabeth Owens. Originally from the UK, the Richmond, Virginia-based artist says “They are a poet & producer constantly coming of age”. Owens not only makes extraordinary music (or sound-scapes), they also create exquisite videos to accompany each track on their album. 

 

 

A Conversation With Jez Ryan of Mammal Sounds. Josh Idehen’s Latest.

Located about 4 miles east of downtown Sydney, Australia you find the beautiful (and celebrated) Bondi Beach, where you’ll also find the home of Mammal Sounds and Jez Ryan the charming chap who runs the label. Mammal Sounds a self-proclaimed boutique label caught my attention because a number of their releases and artists have become frequent additions to the LEM playlists., including, Benji Lewis, Lemonade Baby, Golden Vessel, Hotel Decor, and George Gretton. Our ongoing series of chats with indie labels meant we had to learn more about Mammal Sounds and the indie scene in Australia. With the convoluted fourteen-hour-time difference in effect, a Zoom meeting with Jez was scheduled. At nine am, Sydney time, Mr. Ryan was bright and alert with the morning sun beaming through his window, while the night was settling in – the day before on the east coast of America, an engaging conversation began. You’ll hear Jez Ryan’s insights into the Australian music scene and his selections for the show from Lemonade Baby, Daste, Golden Vessel, and Slouch Online. Thank you, Jez and Mammal Sounds.

Our dear friend, the very talented Joshua Idehen sent us his latest release. “It’s a new side project”, says Josh, “with celebrated producer Daedelus and composer Miguel Atwood Ferguson it’s called Standing In My Own Way (Part One)”. Josh recently became a very proud father and he has taken to posting gorgeous photos of himself smothering his young child with love. And, I do believe, Standing In My Own Way (Part One) is in part a reflection on the knowledge Josh has garnered from people like me who have congratulated him on becoming a father but have also cautioned him to enjoy every teeny tiny precious moment of his new life as a parent. Much love, Josh.

 

LEM Vol 253

Life Elsewhere Music Vol 252

In this volume a wonderful array of new releases for your listening pleasure, including a new single from LEM favorites, King Hannah and we’ll pay respects to the passing of an important contributor to the beginnings of industrial music, Richard H Kirk of the legendary Cabaret Voltaire. First, we get things underway with Sophia Can’t Walk from Obey Cobra’s Oblong LP. The Cardiff based-band says they are, experimental, ethereal psychedelia, post-punk with electronic and heavy flourishes. I say that Kate Wood, Steve O Jones, Rory Coughlan-Allen, Gareth Day, Ian Coote, and Rosemary Swan have made one splendid recording. This is a band to keep an eye on. Golden Vessel & Rei Soi La are out of Brisbane, the two artists were working independently until they released Jersey City as a collaborative single c/o the very fine Mammal imprint. The guys say the song was written almost two years ago when Maxwell (aka Golden Vessel) had just spent some time in Jersey City and was catching the train over to Manhattan each day to explore. Even though Kalem (aka Rei Soi La) had never actually been to Jersey City he really enjoyed living in this brief moment in time that Maxwell was bringing out in the song’s lyrics. Sticky With No Glue is a title I will admit to being tempted to wander off with into salacious territory. Instead, I’ll let Isma & Varnrable explain. Isma is a music producer and DJ from Paris, while Varnrable, is a Norway-raised, Copenhagen-based artist with Ethiopian roots. Their record is on Cascade records out of Paris. The music of Laila Sakini caught my attention and I decided you should hear two in a row from Laila’s What I Got EP, first the title cut followed by Tech Message (dub). Written, recorded, performed, produced, and mixed by Laila Sakini in London, although I believe she is originally out of Melbourne. Listen carefully to her music. So good. In the last volume of LEM we focused on the Toronto-based label, Hand Drawn Dracula, and chatted with label founder, James Mejia, who selected excellent releases from his imprint, including, Vallens. We took a deeper listen to their In Era and picked Sin So Vain for this volume. This rewarding album is complete with a carefully designed sleeve by James Mejia. The first time I played Cabaret Voltaire on the air in America was to my knowledge the very first occasion the proto-industrial trio from Sheffield had radio exposure in the US. A few days before, I’d just returned from a trip to London where I had stopped into the fledgling Rough Trade Records. Geoff Travis had loaded me up with a box of brand new releases for airplay on my radio show in the colonies. One of those platters was the Extended Play EP by Cabaret Voltaire. It was a Thursday night, I had a show on KAOS at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington.  As I back announced Do The Mussolini (Headkick) by Cabaret Voltaire, self-admitted music nerd, Bruce Pavitt bounded into the studio and demanded, “What the fuck was that?” This was 1978, a few years later Pavitt went on to found Sub Pop, (that’s another story). At that time, the sound Richard H Kirk, Stephen Mallendar, and Chris Watson made was so different it triggered an instant reaction from anyone who was listening. And, Cabaret Voltaire was almost unknown in the UK, let alone in the Pacific North West. Over the years the band went on to make numerous recordings, became instrumental in a new genre of music, and reached legendary status by the time the ’80s came to a close. Richard H Kirk remained the sole member continuing on with the original name, (although he used numerous intriguing monikers for various projects, over the years). Late last year (2020), we featured Richard H Kirk’s recent LP, Shadow Of Fear on the show, giving me the opportunity to say, “Kirk is the sole remaining member, this is Cabaret Voltaire’s first studio album in 26 years. Kirk has released many acclaimed solo albums and is credited with creating bleep techno. He formed this new album from a series of pulverizing live shows. There is something timely about this release even if I do get a little nostalgic about playing Nag Nag Nag in a dance club, all those years ago. The influence of Cabaret Voltaire cannot be underestimated”. Richard H Kirk, age 65, passed away on September 21, 2021. Rest in peace.

Whenever I spot a new release on the White Peach label I know it’s going to be good and it deserves to be included on the show. From the Solstice EP, you’ll hear, Impetus by Lofty. I think we can safely say that dubstep, grime, and many more electro genres have their roots in part with Industrial music and Cabaret Voltaire in particular. South London artist, Wu-Lu came to my attention via James Mejia, from his Time EP we go to flip side to hear, Being Me. Miles Romans-Hopcraft is Wu-Lu who writes and produces his own work. Check him out. Black Country, New Road begins Track X with, “You’ve got great hips – I’m still shaking”. Now that should get anyone to listen carefully. Their LP, For The First Time is full of gorgeous music, let me know what you think of this band from London. Over in Dublin creative talent seems to bubble over recently, Cat Dowling being a good example. On the enterprising FIFA label, Cat Dowling gives us Animals and a persuasive reason to explore more of her work. Top marks for the production. At last, it appears some of the popular indie stations around the country are finally catching up with my raving on about King Hannah. The Liverpool duo, Hannah Merrick and Craig Whittle are back with a new single, A Well-Made Woman. They have a video to go along with the cut, you need to see. They say their debut LP should be on the way soon. And, do make sure you listen to my conversation with these very lovely people.

Playlist

  1. Obey Cobra – Sophia Can’t Walk
  2. Golden Vessel & Rei Soi La – Jersey City
  3. Isma & Varnrable – Sticky With No Glue
  4. Laila Sakini – What I Got
  5. Laila Sakini – Tech Message (dub)
  6. Vallens – Sin So Vain
  7. Cabaret Voltaire – Do The Mussolini (Headkick)
  8. Lofty – Impetus
  9. Wu-Lu – Being Me
  10. Black Country, New Road – Track X
  11. Cat Dowling – Animals
  12. King Hannah – A Well-Made Woman

Artwork by Sylvie Archendes 1950 – 2003 “Then again” 1987 12″ x 15″ mixed media, blackberry juice on treated sugar paper. Courtesy of Norman B’s collection

Show LEM 252

A Conversation With James Meija On Hand Drawn Dracula

 

Try to probe James Meija just a little about what he does and you’ll get a limited and not exactly enthusiastic response. But, ask the fellow about music, especially the music he likes, and all of a sudden, you have the man waxing lyrical about My Bloody Valentine, Ride, Slowdive of any of the fabulous bands on his amazing record label. You see the unassuming Mr. Meija is a fan, a true fan of the music he likes. And, he likes a lot of different music. After all, James founded and runs the amazing record label, Hand Drawn Dracula. As proud as he must be of the torrent of incredible releases by his Toronto-based imprint and the stellar artwork he creates, James Meija is almost stoic when it comes to acknowledging his keen ear for remarkable talent. Instead, James sings the praises of the different folks he works with, his love of the community, and his joy in being able to do what he loves so much. All of this adds up to why we have been constantly impressed with the new releases from Hand Drawn Dracula. As each new cut came out and we eagerly slotted it into a new show, we arrived at the conclusion that we had two know more about this curious and innovative label. Contact was made, James agreed to a Zoom conversation. The result is enlightening and entertaining. You’ll hear cuts selected by James, including Breeze, Vallens, Michael Peter Olsen, and Tallies. We are confirmed fans of HDD and if you are not already, you will be after you hear this show! 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Survival of the City. My Sweet Girl.

 
                    
Survival of the City: Living and Thriving in an Age of Isolation – Edward Glaeser & David Cutler

Cities can make us sick. They always have – diseases spread more easily when more people are close to one another. And disease is hardly the only ill that accompanies urban density. Cities have been demonized as breeding grounds for vice and crime from Sodom and Gomorrah on. But cities have flourished nonetheless because they are humanity’s greatest invention, indispensable engines for creativity, innovation, wealth, and connection, the loom on which the fabric of civilization is woven. But cities now stand at a crossroads. During the global COVID crisis, cities grew silent as people worked from home – if they could work at all. The normal forms of socializing ground to a halt. How permanent are these changes? Advances in digital technology mean that many people can opt-out of city life as never before. Will they? Are we on the brink of a post-urban world? City life will survive but individual cities face terrible risks, argue Edward Glaeser and David Cutler, and a wave of urban failure would be absolutely disastrous. In terms of intimacy and inspiration, nothing can replace what cities offer. Great cities have always demanded great management, and our current crisis has exposed fearful gaps in our capacity for good governance. It is possible to drive a city into the ground, pandemic or not. David Cutler, co-author of Survival of the City: Living and Thriving in an Age of Isolation discusses the book with Norman B.

My Sweet Girl – Amanda Jayatissa

Dark thriller. Psychological whodunit. Chilling and shocking. Witty and wicked. These are just some of the descriptions that have been used to describe My Sweet Girl the new novel by Sri Lanka-based author, Amanda Jayatissa. Her delightfully charming and smiley demeanor is at odds with Amanda’s deliciously scary, compelling, and original book. In our Zoom conversation, she breaks into fits of laughter, gesticulating madly as if it’s only by chance she has penned such a stunning read. My Sweet Girl is centered on the meaning of identity and all the layers it can have. This is the story of Paloma who thought her perfect life would begin once she was adopted from a Sri Lankan orphanage and made it to America. But, she finds out no matter how far you run, your past catches up with you. At thirty years old and recently cut off from her parents’ funds, she decides to sublet the second bedroom of her overpriced San Francisco apartment to Arun, who recently moved from India. Paloma has to admit, it feels good helping someone find their way in America – that is until Arun discovers Paloma’s darkest secret, one that could jeopardize her own fragile place in this country. Before Paloma can pay Arun off, she finds him face down in a pool of blood. She flees the apartment but by the time the police arrive, there’s no body – and no evidence that Arun ever even existed in the first place. Paloma is terrified this is all somehow tangled up in the desperate actions she took to escape Sri Lanka so many years ago. Did Paloma’s secret die with Arun or is she now in greater danger than ever before? 

We round out the show with some dark, deep dub courtesy of Infernal Sounds out of Stoke-on-Trent in the UK with Frenchless and 3C 273. Enjoy!

Show 441

« Older Entries