Category Archives: New Music

2020 Special Mentions – Life Elsewhere Music Vol 214

Finally, 2020 is over and here we are as if blinking at unfamiliar bright sunlight, wondering what the new year will bring us. Here at Life Elsewhere Towers the abundance of wonderful new releases throughout 2020 could for a moment belie how rubbish the past twelve months have been. Being in isolation has been the prompt for so many creative folk to get off their arses and – well, create! We avoid Best Of Lists because every cut we play at Life Elsewhere Music has to be Best, otherwise, we wouldn’t play them, so we gave you Not The Best Of 2020. To start the New Year, we are giving a big nod to those who deserve a Special Mention

Miranda McCarthy – From Loving You on first play we were singing along with this song. Yes, it does sound familiar, yet original.  Miranda says, “The song was inspired by the wildness of West Cork and a life in profound transformation.”

Eka –  Shadow Play this song arrived unsolicited from Ekaterine, aka Eka with a wonderful descriptive message, “I’m a French visual artist with multicultural background and influences (French, Vietnamese, Russian and I spent my childhood in Brazil)” Eka went on to tell us all about her creative work. Her music caught our attention, in part because of her slight, lilting accent.  

Tears On Demand – If I Was Alive this is an outstanding example why you should investigate the releases on Shoredive Records. This is entrepreneurial, Nicolas Pierre Wardell, boss of the label’s own outfit. Clearly Nico is fluent in how to make an engaging song. The man’s work is appealing and his label must not be overlooked. 

Wu-Lu – Black Classical Music this cut from the Overgrown Interludes album is a perfect example why you need to spend time carefully listening to creativity of Wu-Lu.

Gad Whip – Sundown since we first heard these lads and their uncompromising music it was obvious they would be on our radar. But, please Gad Whip put out more releases often and send us some videos of you playing live. We want to imagine we are there with you having a mad dance around the place. Simply put, damn good intelligent music to have a knees-up to.

Benin City – Get Your Own and while we are talking about being in the dance. Josh, Shanaz & Tom aka, Benin City have that well covered. It would safe to say, every release from Benin City becomes a big fave for us. This trio know how to work their magic. Exceptional, well-crafted music with a message. In Get Your Own they tackle Covid as only Benin City can. 

Phoebe Coco  Different here is a talented in singer-songwriter-musician who has put our a number of superb releases. There is something about Phoebe output that prompts me to suggest she work with a producer who has another angle on her abilities. I’m thinking Olly Shelton of Pela fame, or maybe Adrian Sherwood. Your thoughts?

Tasha But There’s Still The Moon we keep returning to this cut, trying to analyze why it it works so well. Tasha says “For me, the moon is reliable, beautiful, it’s anchoring.” Written in early 2019, this single takes an optimistic message of gentleness. And, that we agree with.

Talitha Ferri Home she is out of Copenhagen, the album is, Get Well Soon. About this song, Talitha writes, “It was written in retrospect, at a time when I was able to appreciate the fragile moment that is falling in love. That sacred little dance we love to drag on and on, clinging to and resenting the space that stands between us.” Beneath that fragility, is a determined songwriter.

This Is The Kit – This Is What You Did this is the musical project of Kate Stables and whoever joins her in locations such as Winchester, Paris and Bristol. Her album, Off Off On showcases clever songwriting and production skills. There is an energy to be savored. 

Happy Speedy – Fresh Air “I like writing sad lyrics to help me through my feelings (or two),” says Eimear Coyle. The Irish-born singer, now located in Glasgow goes on to say she started the band to help her work through some tough times. With Glasgow friends Kieran Coyle, Rosie Pearse, Siobhain Ma and Connell King, their debut LP, You’re Doing OK is one of those hidden gems you should not pass over.

Miriam Ingram – A Tiny White Dot this poignant song from the album, Spells was produced by her son, Diolmhain Ingram-Roche and a fine job he does too of taking us through a psychedelic, visceral, textured maze of vocal loops and layered synths. Miriam’s observations on life are acute. Essential listening.

Keeno – I Wonder (feat. Ellie Madison) real Drum and Bass, Dubstep or Grime have not made it onto mainstream radio in America, which is why we like to make a point of selecting first-class cuts to wake up the neighbors with. Hospital Records out of the UK have been releasing brilliant cuts since 1996. Use this cut to lead you to discover more essential releases. Keeno’s I Wonder (feat. Ellie Madison) is so infectious, you’ll want to hear more.

Winsome – Untitled here is a fine example of how minimalist digital reggae can be so emotive. Winsome Benjamin was a popular Lover’s Rock chanteuse on the UK scene in the 80s. This 12” was probably originally released a few years back but rereleased to help raise donations to the northeast London migrant action (NELMA) solidarity hardship fund.

Penelope Trappes – Eel Drip to end this Special Mentions show an intriguing release. Eel Drip is about honouring the dead, the passing of lives within you and beyond you,” says the London-based artist. She continues “It’s about physical or emotional change, acknowledging fears, and being true to yourself… reaching your full potential.” Words to ponder as we move into a new year. The accompanying, disturbing video was directed by Agnes Haus and inspired by artist Francesca Woodman’s 1970s series of nude self-portraits with Eels.

Thank you for taking the time to listen to Life Elsewhere Music. Make sure you let us know what you think of the show. Send your thoughts to normanb@lifeelsewhere.co

Playlist

  1. Miranda McCarthy  From Loving You
  2. EKA – Shadow Play
  3. Tears On Demand – If I Was Alive
  4. Wu-Lu – Black Classical Music
  5. Gad Whip – Sundown
  6. Benin City – Get Your Own
  7. Phoebe Coco – Different
  8. Tasha – But There’s Still The Moon
  9. Tabitha Ferri – Home
  10. This Is The Kit – This Is What You Did
  11. Happy Speedy – Fresh Air
  12. Miriam Ingram – A Tiny White Dot
  13. Keeno – I Wonder (feat. Ellie Madison)
  14. Winsome – Untitled (SUG001-B)
  15. Penelope Trappes – Eel Drip

Happy New Year!

The artwork for this volume is by Jamie Singleton “Beautiful Brian” 1997 6’ x 8’ (detail) Giclée print on archival paper of a manipulated video image. Courtesy of Norman B’s collection. The image of the late Brian Jones has nothing to do with this selection of music. We just happen to love it!

LEM Vol 214

Life Elsewhere Music Vol 212

This volume of Life Elsewhere Music will be the last of new releases for 2020, a year we all desperately want to be over. Yet, it must be noted that despite the extraordinary events of the past twelve months was the abundance of excellent new music. And this volume is confirmation. To begin, Covid affected everyone, especially musicians including, Yazmin Lacey & Congi. The duo out of Nottingham recorded in their homes during lockdown and by finishing each song in ‘two takes’, they say, “We kept the process as raw and organic as possible.” Hence, the EP title, Two Takes. Follow Me a deceptively powerful song about a relationship. Don’t let the bell-chimes trick you into not listening carefully. Baby Blue from Frazier Blue has familiar air, yet the smart production and use of different synth pads result in a mysterious love song. I want to hear more from this Sydney-based artist. There is something happening in Dublin. A beautiful city that appears to be festooned with creative talent. Gemma Dunleavy is a terrific ambassador with the release of her EP, Up De Flats. Commenting on those obnoxious blue police lights, so often seen late at night agitating council estates in Stop The Lights, Gemma asserts her opinion in a well-crafted song. A tip-of-the-hat must go to Brendan Doherty on drums on this track. Gemma Dunleavy says, “These songs are dedicated to the people of Sheriff Street flats and the North Wall Community.” You can hear some of the voices of kids from the estate throughout the EP. Some names for bands work so perfectly, but they may mislead you into a preconceived idea of their music, here’s a fine example, Space Basement Cult, a trio from Leeds in Yorkshire. You’ll hear, Phil, The Self-Centered Weatherman which may have you checking off a long list of influences, especially when you take a listen to the other side, Me, The Self-Centered Lover. Influences aside, clearly these lads know what they’re doing, after all, they say they make “Wonk pop”. Recently, Shoegaze has been motivating intuitive young musicians in Seoul, South Korea to have a go. With the album, Fogesque, Fog who label themselves, Seoul City Shoegaze exhibit their enthusiasm. We selected Dehumidifier which builds to an impressive wall-of-noise. Sin is on the almost whispered vocals and guitars, Ryu is on guitars, Oh plays the bass, and 9SUK takes care of the drums and is responsible for the artwork. Next, hold on, while I rave for a moment or two…honestly, I have no idea why I have not had them on the show earlier, but to makeup, you’ll hear two cuts from Rosehip Teahouse’s Fine EP. I Meant What I Said and I’m Not Whole, if there were time, I’d play the whole EP, it’s that good. The Cardiff-based band is Faye Rogers, Tony Williams, Josh Dickins, Will Dickins, and Alice Low. “A twinkling descent into sadness.” They say about their music and Faye Rogers writes, “The songs cover love, losing love, fighting an eating disorder that wanted to take me over completely, my unregulated emotions, dreams (both literal and metaphorical) finding some sort of meaning amongst it all and coming out the other side, slightly stronger as a result of it.” I am entranced. Adelaide is the cut you’ll hear from the debut EP, Devil’s Rain from Maria BC. Almost apologetically, they say the EP was recorded in their apartment during lockdown in NYC – they usually sing much louder but had to keep the noise down, so as not to disturb the neighbors. And I say, I’m just thankful you made the recording. Beautiful! Maria BC adds, “I hope people find some intimacy in these songs.” Noé Solange is a London based producer, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and (I believe) photographer. Her heritage is Dutch/Indonesian and being raised around the world, Noé pulls cultural threads from her upbringing. This all comes together in the gently persuasive love song, Falling from her EP Bound. Top marks for the production. On her website, Seraphina Simone says, “Writes music to make bad decisions to.” Well, I made the good decision to include, Blue Devil in this volume. Seraphina is based in London, but she grew up between London and LA, she writes, “My songs draw on the syrupy seediness of Cali glamour and murky, neon-lit London grit.” You are advised to check out more from Seraphina. Next, we go to Chicago where Serena Isioma doesn’t mess around in asking, Why Am I So Toxic. Thankfully, gender-fluid songs are being heard and enjoyed beyond limited audiences. On their EP, The Leo Sun Sets, Serena Isioma ably demonstrates they are a competent songwriter and performer who can deliver a message. Spoken word artists are coming to the fore again and Sophie Sparham is garnering much-deserved praise. She partners with saxophonist, Christopher Gregory for this album, Sunrise Over Aldi. Hailing from Derby, Sophie will probably be surprised to learn her distinctive dialect sounds exotic to the American ear. You’ll hear the title cut, but make sure you check the rest of the album out. Here is that question of name choices again, John Edgar has a beautiful voice, plays excellent piano, and writes gorgeous plaintive songs. And, he uses the moniker, The Dawdler which is, I presume is intentionally misleading. John says he is well acquainted with the darker sides of life, his new EP, Sign of Growth, touches on subjects such as death, loneliness, grief, and alcoholism. Don’t Get Blue is the cut we have chosen. A large thumbs up to the other musicians involved in this album. Excellent. Last but certainly not least are Caitlin Loney and Peter Woodford from Montreal who perform here as Freelove Fenner. Their album, Punishment Zone is a well-produced, somewhat restrained affair, showing off superb songwriting and performing. Shoulder Season is a fine example. Our next volume will the big finalé for 2020 where once again we present, Not The Best Of. That’s right, far too much incredibly good music has come our way in the last 12 months to make a Best Of list. Instead, we will give you the most-played at Life Elsewhere Towers. 

Thank you for listening to volume 212 of Life Elsewhere Music. Happy! Merry! Jolly!

LEM Vol 212 Playlist
  1. Yazmin Lacey & Congi – Follow Me
  2. Frazier Blue – Baby Blue
  3. Gemma Dunleavy – Stop The Lights
  4. Space Basement Cult – Phil, The Self-Centered Weatherman
  5. Fog – Dehumidifier
  6. Rosehip Teahouse – I Meant What I Said
  7. Rosehip Teahouse – I’m Not Whole
  8. Maria BC – Adelaide
  9. Noé Solange – Falling
  10. Seraphina Simone – Blue Devil
  11. Serena Isioma – Why Am I So Toxic
  12. Sophie Sparham & Christopher Gregory – Sunrise Over Aldi
  13. The Dawdler – Don’t Get Blue
  14. Freelove Fenner – Shoulder Season

The artwork for this volume is by Shane Compton “Axiom #4” 2016 12” x 8” mixed media on laminated wood. Courtesy of Norman B’s collection

LEM Vol 212

LEM Vol 190 – Image & Music – A Conversation With Pela + Music From Calabashed & DJ Squarewave

Popular music has always been about image. From the brazen eighteen-year-old truck driver in Memphis, Tennessee who donned showy pimp-like garb slicked his not-yet jet-black hair into a pompadour, grew sideburns and applied eyeliner and rouge – to the spotty youth from Aberdeen, Washington with straggly blond hair and a habit for raggedy urchin-look cardigans,  image was all-important. It still is today. Recently,  I pondered on the relevance of image while chatting via Zoom to Hannah Coombes and Olly Shelton, who go by the moniker of Pela. The South London duo had made a couple of singles which led to my enthusiastic raving, in turn requesting an interview. Looking at the poised couple via Zoom I couldn’t resist mentioning how lovely they are. “You’re gorgeous!” I blurted out. But, my sense of what is politically correct stymied my urge to babble on about Hannah and Olly’s fabulous camera-ready looks. We are here to talk about Pela’s intriguing music, I reminded myself. Their singles, You Got Me and South Of are so good I included them back-to-back in Life Elsewhere Music Vol. 187. Hannah’s sensual voice with Olly’s manipulated sounds presents a “now” sound with honest references to the best of past popular music. The duo has a distinctive sound that is thankfully difficult to categorize. Listen closely to the start of You Got Me, is that a needle dropping on a scratchy disc? The tinkered-with title is repeated then Hannah’s crystal-clear vocals come in as a plaintive piano coda plays with a guitar or processed “other” sounds appearing here and there. More manipulated vocals and the tune fades with a morse-code-like sound emanating from who knows what source Olly has played with. South Of opens with a keyboard riff or maybe it’s a processed guitar, after all in our chat Olly makes it clear he enjoys disguising the original sounds and instruments. Again, Hannah’s voice delivers emotive words. Is this a love song? Is she in despair of a lover leaving? Does South Of (Something) mean it’s all over? The absence of obvious drums with a bass directing the beat adds to the mystery. Olly’s deft hand at the mixing board and digital production are ion fine display on this track. Their latest release, Reverie sounds so familiar as it begins. You cannot help feeling you’ve heard this cut before. It’s that good. Except, it’s completely new. A sax appears to confirm this is an original masterwork of pop music. The title and the lyrics almost contradict Hannah’s seemingly laid-back delivery. She’s questioning, “Are we in reverie?” What happened? An unrequited love affair? “I think we might be holding on” she offers. Reverie sounds nothing like Human League’s Don’t You Want Me, yet here is a song with the same magic formula that’ll have you singing along with the chorus. Hannah and Olly very kindly allowed us to include an as-yet-unreleased track to round out the show, All The Way (With Me). Here Olly gets busy from the opening with processed vocal samples. Is that Hannah at a different pitch? The blips and beats could be micro edits of well anything…is that Hannah in reverse? We catch glimpses of lyrics, “All the way with me”, “In the morning sun…”. This is the most abstract of Pela’s work so far. It drives along with a percussive beat that will surely turn out to be anything but percussion. Then, All The Way (With Me) stops suddenly leaving the listener wanting more. Hannah and Olly are engaging, honest, and forthright. They make wonderful, innovative music and yes, they are delightful to look at.

Ask Joshua Idehen about image and I dare say he will not be lost for words. A favorite guest on Life Elsewhere, Josh of Hugh and Benin City fame has teamed up with Alabaster DePlume to form Calabashed. With other notable musicians from London, Calabashed has released, Ode To Jazzman John Clarke. This is what Josh says about the track, “So yeah, a story. There used to be a poet on the scene, Jazzman John Clarke. One of the mad ones to be honest. You’d see him at any open mic, pages full of rants and pain and fuckifiknows. But every time we spoke, he was always kind to me, treated me as an equal even when I had just started out. I remember, at a jazz open mic, halfway through a performance, he threw his papers in the air, jumped on the stage and yelled: “I WEAR MY SOUL AS A JACKET!” I didn’t even know what he meant, only that it shook me. I’m glad I got to tell him that night. He passed away, I found out via Facebook. I felt in a way like I could have been more than a poet acquaintance, but that’s another story. This song is in honor of him.” And we are honored to play, Calabashed Ode To Jazzman John Clarke. Thank you Josh for sending the music file over to us.

The image of Dubstep and Drum & Bass may well be a little fuzzy here in the US. None-the-less, these genres of music overlap, encouraging a large fan-base worldwide. With a critical eye on always trying to include as many styles of modern music in my shows, Dubstep and Drum & Bass have become consistent additions. I’m always on the lookout for the exceptional offering, so listen carefully to DJ Squarewave & Frenk Dublin ft. DRS with Word Forbidden on New World Audio. London based DJ Squarewave has been involved in the scene since the age of 16. Having started out buying turntables, collecting records and playing at drum and bass events. So far, I haven’t caught too many pictures of the man, but I have no doubt that he carefully considers his image. You don’t have to dress up to listen to this volume of Life Elsewhere Music, but I do ask you to be aware that para-military clobber on anyone ‘ain’t cool. 

Norman B. 7.18.2020

Rest In Peace John Lewis & C.T. Vivian

Two Disturbing Books. An Impressive Movie. Plaintive New Music.

 
James B. Stewart – Deep State: Trump, The FBI, And The Rule Of Law

There are questions that the Mueller report couldn’t—or wouldn’t—answer. What actually happened to instigate the Russia investigation? Did President Trump’s meddling incriminate him? There’s no mystery to what Trump thinks. He claims that the Deep State, a cabal of career bureaucrats—among them, Andrew McCabe, Lisa Page, and Peter Strzok, previously little known figures within the FBI whom he has obsessively and publically reviled—is concerned only with protecting its own power and undermining the democratic process. Conversely, James Comey has defended the FBI as incorruptible apolitical public servants who work tirelessly to uphold the rule of law. For the first time, bestselling author James B. Stewart sifts these conflicting accounts to present a clear-eyed view of what exactly happened inside the FBI in the lead-up to the 2016 election, drawing on scores of interviews with key FBI, Department of Justice, and White House officials and voluminous transcripts, notes, and internal reports. In full detail, this is the dramatic saga of the FBI’s simultaneous investigations of both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump—the first time in American history the FBI has been thrust into the middle of both parties’ campaigns for the presidency. Stewart shows what exactly was set in motion when Trump fired Comey, triggering the appointment of Robert Mueller as an independent special counsel and causing the FBI to open a formal investigation into the president himself. And how this unprecedented event joined in ongoing combat two vital institutions of American democracy: the presidency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. At stake in this epic battle is the rule of law itself, the foundation of the U.S. Constitution. There is no room for compromise, but plenty for collateral damage. The reputations of both sides have already been harmed, perhaps irrevocably, and at great cost to American democracy. Deep State goes beyond the limits of the legally constrained Mueller report, showing how the president’s obsession with the idea of a conspiracy against him is still upending lives and sending shockwaves through both the FBI and the Department of Justice. In this world-historical struggle—Trump versus intelligence agencies—Stewart shows us in rare style what’s real and what matters now. And for the looming 2020 election.

Julian E. Zelizer – Burning Down The House: Newt Gingrich, The Fall Of A Speaker, And The Rise Of The New Republican Party

When Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, President Obama observed that Trump “is not an outlier; he is a culmination, a logical conclusion of the rhetoric and tactics of the Republican Party.” In Burning Down The House, historian Julian Zelizer pinpoints the moment when our country was set on a path toward an era of bitterly partisan and ruthless politics, an era that was ignited by Newt Gingrich and his allies. In 1989, Gingrich brought down Democratic Speaker of the House Jim Wright and catapulted himself into the national spotlight. Perhaps more than any other politician, Gingrich introduced the rhetoric and tactics that have shaped Congress and the Republican Party for the last three decades. Elected to Congress in 1978, Gingrich quickly became one of the most powerful figures in America not through innovative ideas or charisma, but through a calculated campaign of attacks against political opponents, casting himself as a savior in a fight of good versus evil. Taking office in the post-Watergate era, he weaponized the good government reforms newly introduced to fight corruption, wielding the rules in ways that shocked the legislators who had created them. His crusade against Democrats culminated in the plot to destroy the political career of Speaker Wright. While some of Gingrich’s fellow Republicans were disturbed by the viciousness of his attacks, party leaders enjoyed his successes so much that they did little collectively to stand in his way. Democrats, for their part, were alarmed, but did not want to sink to his level and took no effective actions to stop him. It didn’t seem to matter that Gingrich’s moral conservatism was hypocritical or that his methods were brazen, his accusations of corruption permanently tarnished his opponents. This brand of warfare worked, not as a strategy for governance but as a path to power, and what Gingrich planted, his fellow Republicans reaped. He led them to their first majority in Congress in decades, and his legacy extends far beyond his tenure in office. From the Contract with America to the rise of the Tea Party and the Trump presidential campaign, his fingerprints can be seen throughout some of the most divisive episodes in contemporary American politics. Burning Down The House presents the alarming narrative of how Gingrich and his allies created a new normal in Washington. 

Disclosure

Disclosure, a new independent movie from Australia asks the question, what would you do if your child came to you and began telling you a story about something that happened to them, that is one of your worst nightmares as a parent? And what would be the consequences of your actions? This is director, Michael Bentham’s debut full-length film, set in the lush tropical landscape of Victoria. The story is a dark psychodrama, yet Bentham shooting in 4K captures startlingly colorful scenes with unobtrusive camerawork and exceptional acting. Norman B was so impressed with Disclosure, he wants you to know all about it. In this edition of Life Elsewhere, you’ll hear his review.

Jess Williamson ft. Hand Habits – Pictures Of Flowers

To round out the show, new music from Jess Williamson featuring Hand Habits with the lovely and plaintive, Pictures Of Flowers. Written by Jess and performed by Jess Williamson (acoustic guitar, vocals), Meg Duffy (electric guitar), and Jarvis Taveniere (bass, drums, mellotron) remotely from their homes during quarantine. In her bio, the Texas-born, L.A.-based singer-songwriter is described as making “…deeply felt songs that orbit around her powerful voice, a voice that’s strong and vulnerable, big room flawless, quietly ecstatic, and next-to-you intimate.” We agree. 

Please let us know what you think of Life Elsewhere, we want to hear your feedback, your questions, queries, and comments. Write to normanb@lifeelsewhere.co

Show #381

LIFE ELSEWHERE MUSIC VOL 177 ISOLATION MIX 3

 

Perhaps I’ve had more time on my hands because of this self-isolating predicament, I know I’ve listened to far more new music than usual. And, usually, I listen to more new music in a week than most people have had hot dinners. OK, that might be a slight exaggeration, but the truth is, I do listen to a shitload of new music. Curating the cuts for a 60-minute show can prove exhausting. For this volume, I eliminated on average a ratio of 5 to 1. Am I being too harsh? Does listening to more music mean I’m extra critical? A massive amount of new music is being created daily. Most of it well-intentioned by talented people, yet I’m always searching for the cuts deserving repeated plays – and your attention. We begin volume 177 with a positive, upbeat single from Abakush with Cush, produced by Jah Fingers at Mark Angelo Studio on the Common Ground International imprint, out of London. Staying in a UK reggae vibe, Nick Woodmansey, aka Emanative along with Tamar Collocutor gives us Energy. Next, Remi Wolf out of LA delivers her pugnacious lyrics in rapid style, including, “…you run out of Oxycontin” on Woo! (Porches Remix). From the LP farawayfromeveryoneyouknow, New York-based, Altopalo says Am I Am. There was a time in my life when the world was dark and hope seemed to evade me, but then Love met me at the Well and out of all the mess came Victory!” Says ThandiwekaYah from Johannesburg, South Africa. You’ll hear Babylon, You Great City from her EP, Well.Love.Victory. Colombian artist Gabriela Jimeno presents as Ela Minus. Her debut single for Domino Record Co is, They Told Us It Was Hard, But They Were Wrong. Despite the long list of credits of I’m sure wonderfully talented people, the official video for this song is, unfortunately, a terrible mess. Arqestry from California proclaims, The questioning of my beliefs, spirituality, relationships, and existentialism” we are not sure if that refers to the LP Pale Blue or the cut Small – or both. Hippie mom makes daughter with hippie songs,” Says the notes to Lalande with Delusional Trip from the EP Osglim. This is the work of Lia Braswell who started playing drums at eight years old, she began to enjoy it more than any other outlet (besides singing, which she took on by listening to her mom, Jo Alice Braswell, sing all around the house). After many years in the music business, Lia currently resides between Los Angeles and New York. Half Waif is the musical home of singer/songwriter/producer Nandi Rose. We’ve raved about her on previous volumes of LEM and Blinking Light for her latest LP The Caretaker hasn’t changed our minds. Jonnine Standish and Nigel Yang perform as HTRK, based in Melbourne the duo released Venus In Leo in 2019, we love Into The Drama. Their latest release is Rarities which includes Blending’ (Demo) recorded in London 2010. We love that too. “Groovy, lumpy, sonic shit” is how Sleepy House a duo from California describe their music. Do you agree after listening to Concussed? Little Spoon, Who Are You Drinking is by Fuvk from Austin, Texas. We promise Spellcheck will correct you on that name. Dutch frontwoman Michelle Hindriks of Ciel says she moved back to her adopted hometown Brighton and gained inspiration to write the songs that form the band’s debut EP, Movement. We selected, It’s Not All The Same. To close out LEM Vol 177, we go to Denmark to hearSurreal synth noise and depressive field recordings” courtesy of Rölling Stëins with They Brought Mich Jägër In for Questioning from their LP: Rölled Göld. The line-up is worth noting: Mich Jäger (Leslie Singer): Theoretical Vocals, Këith Rikkard (Ditlev Buster): Theoretical Leed Geetar, Bïlly Prëston (Carrie Beyer): Theoretical Steinway. Available on Tribe Tapes out of North Carolina.

There you have it, Isolation Mix 3. Enjoy and stay safe.

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