Category Archives: New Music

The Stonewall Anniversary + A Conversation With m1nk

June 28, 2019, marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, which is considered the most significant event in the gay liberation movement, and the catalyst for the modern fight for LGBTQ rights in the United States. Drawing from the New York Public Library’s archives, The Stonewall Reader is a collection of first accounts, diaries, periodic literature, and articles from LGBTQ magazines and newspapers that documented both the years leading up to and the years following the riots. Most importantly the anthology spotlights both iconic activists who were pivotal in the movement, such as Sylvia Rivera, co-founder of Street Transvestites Action Revolutionaries (STAR), as well as forgotten figures like Ernestine Eckstein, one of the few out, African American, lesbian activists in the 1960s. The anthology focuses on the events of 1969, the five years before, and the five years after. Jason Baumann, the NYPL coordinator of humanities and LGBTQ collections, has edited and introduced the volume top coincide with the NYPL exhibition he has curated on the Stonewall uprising and gay liberation of 1969.

m1nk, (pronounced em one en kay), first came to our attention over a year ago with their independently released single, Fuck You Up. Then, two excellent follow-up singles, The Far Side and eBomb prompted us to make contact with the talented duo behind m1nk. Recently, on a beautiful sunny afternoon in Athens, we caught up m1nk for an in-depth conversation. Erika Bach (aka Lola Demo) is based in Athens by way of Australia and Germany. She says she comes from a more garage rock background with some electronic influences in her productions. Trainspotters may argue Erika’s haunting voice and edgy trash ethic evoke identifiable references, but we prefer to think she has a style all of her own. Barry Snaith (aka The Inconsistent Jukebox), moves effortlessly between genres, his productions encompassing everything from acerbic alt-pop and industrial soundscapes to French cabaret and dubstep. Together as m1nk, they make dark, gothic, electronic soundscapes. They are certainly distinctive, yet hard to define. In our conversation, you’ll be impressed by their candor and the passion they so obviously have for the music they make. Based in Manchester, UK and Athens, Greece, m1nk have just released their album m1nk = em one en kay on Seja Records out of The Netherlands.

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

If you miss any editions of Life Elsewhere, go here then go to the Listen On-Demand panel, choose the date of a show and click play.

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Show #322

David R Dow & Phoebe Coco

He is a lawyer working on death row inmate appeals. Earlier in his career, he admits to being firmly in favor of capital punishment. His exposure to “the degrading of human life” on death row, made him question the ultimate punishment. He is, David R. Dow is the founder and director of the Texas Innocence Network and the Juvenile and Capital Advocacy Project He and his team have represented well over 100 death row inmates during state and federal appeals. For his debut novel, Dow wanted to capture the emotional turmoil of someone who uses vengeance and retribution as a form of justice and to reflect on the U.S. criminal justice system from the vantage point of those most directly affected by it. In his realistic suspense novel, Confessions Of An Innocent Man, Dow does just that. Through deeply affecting and empathetic characters he explores the injustices of the death penalty regime in Texas, delivering a perfect modern parable in the form of a whip-smart psychological thriller. In our conversation, David discusses his novel and shares his well-considered thoughts on crime and punishment.

Phoebe Coco first came to our attention with a video for her debut single, Silver Lives. Accompanied by her twin sisters, Grace, and Dorothy, the three young ladies frolic at a wind-swept English seaside. The effect is hazily charming, yet as you listen to her words, you may catch a reference to a now-dismissed love affair or is it simply moving on and embracing life? This may well be the conundrum of the London-based singer-songwriter. She exudes an innocence, yet she proves a worldly-wise understanding of how to write beautiful music. Along with her talented songwriting and performing, Phoebe has proven to be a capable composer of instrumentals for a variety of exciting projects. In our conversation, you’ll hear a refreshingly exuberant talent talk uninhibitedly about music, her life, the future, and her dear departed dog. Plus, Phoebe Coco treats us to a special impromptu rendition of Silver Lives, accompanying herself on one of her treasured a keyboards.

A longer version of our conversation with Phoebe Coco and another impromptu performance will air shortly on Life Elsewhere Music.

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

If you miss any editions of Life Elsewhere, go here then go to the Listen On-Demand panel, choose the date of a show and click play.

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Show #319

The Last Act + Wild Hxmans

After chatting with Brad Parks for a few moments, you’ll quickly understand why he is an international bestselling author. Parks has that special raconteur’s gift which he uses to full effect in his novels. The Last Act, Brad’s latest crime thriller delivers twists and turns right up until the last page. Tommy Jump is an out-of-work stage actor approached by the FBI with the role of a lifetime: Go undercover at a federal prison, impersonate a convicted felon, and befriend a fellow inmate, a disgraced banker named Mitchell Dupree who knows the location of documents that can be used to bring down a ruthless drug cartel. . . if only he’d tell the FBI where they are. Brad Parks joins Life Elsewhere to talk about The Last Act, the fast-paced conversation covers the background to his new novel, and gives a glimpse into the curious mind of the author.

Toward the end of last year a sound-file arrived, unannounced in our mailbox. This was the latest work of Christian Kjellvander with his album, Wild Hxmans, where he replaces the U with an X. The 42-year-old Swedish singer-songwriter speaks of farewells and departures, of escape and the sensation of arriving in a new world. The multifaceted songs are carried by Christian’s wondrous voice, with echoes of Leonard Cohen, Neil Young and David Sylvian, yet distinctly his own. For the program, we chose Halle Lay Lu Jah to entice you to learn more about this enigmatic artist. Enjoy.

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

If you miss any editions of Life Elsewhere, go here then go to the Listen On-Demand panel, choose the date of a show and click play.

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Show #315 V2

A Tribute to Albert Finney + New Music From The UK

“The death of Albert Finney could mark the end of a certain generation of British actors.” Says film and media critic, Bob Ross in our tribute to the highly-rated star of stage, screen, and TV, who sadly died a few days ago on February 7. Finney came to prominence in the era of the “Angry Young Men”. It was a period that transformed the face of British theater and cinema from the 1950s. Powerfully built, Finney had the resonant voice beloved by earlier generations of stage actors. Born in Salford, Lancashire, May 1936, Finney’s father was a bookmaker. Always proud of his working-class roots, he once said, “It’s part of you, it’s in your blood.” Although he had acquired a taste for acting while still at Salford Grammar School where he won a scholarship to The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He worked first with Birmingham Repertory Theatre before moving on to the Old Vic and National Theatre. His first London stage appearance was in 1958 in Jane Arden’s The Party, which was directed by Charles Laughton, who also starred. A year later, the young Finney was at Stratford where he replaced an ill Laurence Olivier in the role of Coriolanus. In 1960, he appeared alongside Olivier in his first film, The Entertainer, directed by Tony Richardson. Based on a play by John Osborne, it was an example of a new gritty style of British film-making that became known as kitchen-sink drama. Its heroes were invariably working-class, the backdrops often that of northern England, and it explored themes of social alienation. Finney’s next film, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, gave him a starring role as a young factory worker who was disillusioned with his lot. The plot, based on a novel by Alan Sillitoe, featured extramarital sex and abortion, earning it an X-certificate from the British Board of Film Censors. He was approached to play Lawrence of Arabia in David Lean’s film but, after going through a four-day screen test, Finney decided not to take the role that eventually went to Peter O’Toole. Instead, he teamed up with Tony Richardson again for Tom Jones, an adaptation of Henry Fielding’s bawdy 18th Century novel. Tom Jones made Finney an international star and he was voted one of the top ten British actors of 1963 by cinema owners. In the 1967 film Charlie Bubbles, which Finney also directed, he played a writer returning to his northern roots after becoming successful in London. In one scene, Finney’s character is pictured driving his gold Rolls Royce through the crumbling streets of his native Salford. He also proved he could sing, first in the title role of the 1970 musical film Scrooge and then in the 1982 film version of the Broadway musical Annie. In 1974, he played the pedantic Hercule Poirot in the film Murder on the Orient Express. He had a magnetic presence off-screen too. His lovers included Joan Baez, Carly Simon, Billie Whitelaw, Jacqueline Bisset, Shelley Winters, and Diana Quick. In 1957, he married Jane Wenham, with whom he had a son. The couple divorced just five years later. In 1970, he married the French actress Anouk Aimee. Later in life, he settled down with Penne Delmarche and admitted to only two vices – wine and horseracing. He owned several racehorses, stabled in America. He had kidney cancer diagnosed in 2007, and he disappeared from public view but returned with roles in The Bourne Ultimatum and James Bond film Skyfall. He largely ignored the celebrity lifestyle and refused becoming CBE in 1980 and a knight in 2000. “I think the Sir thing slightly perpetuates one of our diseases in England, which is snobbery,” he said at the time. “And it also helps keep us ‘quaint’, which I’m not a great fan of.”

Also in this edition of Life Elsewhere, three new singles from the United Kingdom. First up, a four-piece band who prefer their name in all caps, ISLAND with All In My Head. On our show, you’ll hear instrumental and vocal versions from the London-based band. If you don’t understand the song, you’re not alone, this is what frontman, Rollo Doherty says about their new single, “It’s weird, we didn’t really understand the song when we started writing it but we liked that about it, we didn’t try to understand it. The lyrics just take that idea and put it through a blender. Weirdness just mixed up with more weirdness. Just like what’s in my head.” Next up, a young gentleman we have been raving about for around two years now, the very talented, Leaone. The singer-songwriter was in the US a few months back and had the opportunity to record a few cuts in a Brooklyn studio with producer, Tom Marsh. The results are what Leaone refers to as “The Brooklyn Sessions”, Prairie Fire is his latest single. Our third new release is from the fine folks associated with Gad Whip. Lee who tinkers around in his Yuba Recording Studio sent us a new single, Now, a mesmerizing track that we have had on repeat play for the last few days. Yubamusic is the moniker Lee is using for this release. If we can be of any encouragement at all, we’d like to hear more cuts in this vein from Yubamusic.

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

If you miss any editions of Life Elsewhere, go here then go to the Listen On-Demand panel, choose the date of a show and click play.

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Show #310 V3

A Conversation With Thomas Pitts

“Doing a long interview like this is kind of cathartic.” Says Thomas Pitts of London-based Auld. Talking about himself and his music does not come easily for Thom. Being verbose about your own talent is often difficult for artists, adding to the contradiction that so often surrounds a person who chooses to get up on stage as an entertainer. Yet, for all the questions Mr. Pitts implies about shyness, you cannot overlook his mastery of writing and performing listenable music. Thankfully, Thom and his cohorts in Auld embrace what they term as “genre fluid” as they frame their story through the lens of indie pop, sometimes rock, and sometimes electro. They like a good cry and they like a good dance and they want you to join them. Their just-released first single, Need Her Still is a good introduction to the Auld sound. I wrote this and then everything started to fall into place afterward,” says Pitts.“This is the only love song I have ever written. Lyrically it is quite simple – it is a list of things that would make life quite nice and more enjoyable on paper but all of these mean nothing without the person you love”.

Thomas Pitts’ fascination with music began with an obsession over the Spice Girls at 9 years of age. He wrote songs to the tunes of their songs and also to the tunes of the Lion King. Fast forward to the appearance of The Strokes, which influenced Pitts to form a rather young band emulating that sound. Auld started by Thomas Pitts as a solo project. They currently perform as a 6-piece, with Pitts joined by Alan Giles, Brian Wortman, Rachel Hearne, Glen Giles, and James Milner. Their debut album, Mainstream Music will be released in the middle of March. On the next edition of Life Elsewhere, hear cuts from the album and Thomas Pitts’s uninhibited conversation with Norman B.

The Podcast is available at NPR One, Apple Podcasts & Mixcloud

Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3
Sundays 10.00am ET at WNRM The Root
Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at 
NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network
Fridays at 9.00pm GMT on Cornucopia Radio

If you miss any editions of Life Elsewhere, go here then go to the Listen On-Demand panel, choose the date of a show and click play.

Life Elsewhere Music airs:
Sundays 11.00am ET at 
WNRM The Root
Wednesdays at 3.00pm Pacific Time on 
NWCZ Radio
Fridays at 10.00am Eastern Time on IRN
Cornucopia Radio airs Life Elsewhere Music throughout each week
You can hear all the volumes over at Mixcloud

Show #309 V2

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