Tag Archives: Barzin

Revisiting Challenging Covid With Music!

It will be one year ago on Sunday, April 25th, 2020 that we aired this show. 12 months later, Covid is still with us.

Barzin, the talented singer-songwriter, poet, all-round good guy, and friend of Life Elsewhere alerted us to a new compilation he had contributed a previously unreleased cut to. If Barzin was involved it had to be seriously worth checking out. We did. And, it is. “Love In The Time Of Covid” curated by Andrea Vascellari, is an exceptional collection of music. Based in North-East Italy where the virus has wreaked devastating havoc, Andrea took it upon himself to reach out to acts from the most relevant in slowcore, dreampop, and drone-rock scenes. He requested tracks that had not been released before. And, he explained, “All proceeds will go to the Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund, supporting the World Health Organization’s work to track and understand the spread of the virus, to ensure patients get the care they need and the frontline workers get essential supplies and information, and to accelerate research and development of a vaccine and treatments for all who need them”. The seventeen tracks Andrea selected for “Love In The Time Of Covid” perfectly evoke this peculiar and unfathomable of times we are all enduring. Andrea Vascellari is a fan, he is a musician, he is passionate about bringing together this remarkable compilation to challenge Covid.

Please make sure you do not miss our exclusive conversation with Andrea Vascellari. And, support this cause.

LE Show 421

 

 

 

Rudy Tambala on A. R. Kane, Jübl & The Business Of Life

Discovering new music has been an integral part of my life for many years. That that I’m still able to get giddy with excitement when hearing Arlo Parks or Pela or Barzin for the first time is, honestly, the same rush I got when hearing The Stones at The Railway Hotel, the same night Andrew Loog Oldham showed up and changed history. Your brain-pan is either open to new music or it’s stuck in a musty-dusty time warp which usually marks the time you first said, I love you after an orgasm — and meant it. The notes accompanying the new album, Sweet Company by Jabu cite A. R. Kane as an influence which makes discovering new music to another level. The impact A. R. Kane’s Lolita had on me was has resonated for over thirty years. How exciting then to know that Amos Childs, Jasmine Butt, Alex Rendall, and Daniela Dyson of Jabu unabashedly give a nod to Rudy Tambala and Alex Ayuli of A. R. Kane. No doubt, many musicians have, over the years listened carefully for hours to Lolita and asked, How did they get that sound? That plaintive, sexy treated guitar sound mixed with an acoustic on top, the seductive voice, and then — the thundering electric guitar explodes in your head! From the first moment I heard Lolita, I had to hear it again and again. Thirty years on, it still sounds so modern, so new. And of course, there was the sleeve. Enterprising 4AD records were known for inventive artwork, but this one went further. A provocative nude, a young girl — holding behind her back a huge knife! The sum total of the sound and image A. R. Kane presented was/is extraordinary, as in fuckin’ brilliant. A year or so back I blabbered on about my fascination and enthusiasm for A. R. Kane to Rudy Tambala in a long in-depth conversation. I soon learned that Rudy is a smart guy, he’s well-read, he’s articulate and he enjoys a spirited conversation. He’s sincere when he states, “Rock ’n’ roll is fucking sex! It’s the rhythm of your blood. It’s the most vital force. Without it, there isn’t any existence on this planet!” The irony of his words adds to the fascination of listening to a man whose creative talent has been on display for over three decades. The forthright musician reveals how he and his bandmate, Alex Ayuli created their extraordinary and frequently emulated sound. He talks enthusiastically of the beginnings of A. R. Kane, detailing the creation of the noted Lollita artwork. Rudy shares his thoughts on current music, design and why style is important, “It’s not what you play it’s the way you hold your guitar. It not what you wear it’s how your hair looks…it’s a youth thing.” He says wryly. The legacy of A. R. Kane continues with his new band, Jübl and Rudy gives us an insider’s take on the demands of his new project. This is an interview full of warmth and candor. The conversation flows seamlessly from previously unheard details about recording techniques to spot-on observations about the business of life. Thank you Rudy for a wonderful conversation.

Norman B October 9, 2020

Show #393

A Conversation With Barzin

Barzin

Although murmurs of Leonard Cohen’s failing health had occasionally filtered through in the last twelve months or so, his passing did catch most of us by surprise. The loss of a true artistic giant in our ever-evaporating world seemed all the more poignant as the same world shuddered mere hours before when the results of the US Presidential election were announced. Cohen and his music had touched me deeply from the moment in 1967 when I first heard Songs Of Leonard Cohen. To the time I was lucky enough to meet the man, in the early 90’s, backstage, when he performed in Seattle. As I made my way to the great man’s dressing room, an always-shy young musician I knew, stopped me to ask in a whisper, if I could take him to meet his idol, and I did. Mr. Cohen was gracious, generously friendly, and very, very funny. The young musician with his trademark ragged blond haircut barely looked up, his hunched posture didn’t hide his obviously quivering skinny frame. He mumbled thanks to the legendary performer and to me, then backed out of the room like a nervous shadow. It was just a few short months later when TV cameras from all over the world were crammed into the studio as I tried to concentrate on my drive-time radio show. The reporters asked, “What could I tell them about the chart-topping, twenty-seven-year-old musician who had blown his brains out?” I retraced these memories as I digested the news of Leonard Cohen’s death, while TV and radio seemed to play “Hallelujah” in a continuous loop. Then, I saw my other favorite Canadian singer/songwriter/poet, Barzin had made a very rare appearance on Facebook by posting a tribute to Leonard Cohen. From there, it was obvious, I wanted Barzin to share his appreciation of Cohen for you on Life Elsewhere. A recording session was arranged and in the next edition of the program, you’ll hear the talented Barzin talk about the unavoidable influence of Leonard Cohen. Our informal chat continues on with Barzin sharing a deeply moving account of his work on a soundtrack for “Viewfinder”, a feature film by British filmmaker, Jason Yeoman. The story has a surprising twist, you won’t want to miss. He also assures us that he is working on a new album, set for release in Spring of 2017. Plus, the always cool, mild-mannered Barzin offers a glimpse into the Canadian view of recent political events south of the border.
Norman B. November 23, 2016

Life Elsewhere Show #197 airs:
Sundays 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays 5.00pm PT & Wednesdays 2.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio
Thursdays 6.00pm ET at Internet Radio Network

Legendary Music Interviews.

Norman B‘s interviews are legendary, since the late 70’s he has chatted with rising stars to superstars, unexpected newsmakers to career politicians, revered celebrities to aspiring entrepreneurs. His thoughtful and inquisitive approach has led to a vast archive of memorable and revealing conversations, especially with musicians. Yet, artists from the world of music are not always forthcoming or willing to divulge their “real” opinions, but Norman B has a knack of getting his musical guests to talk openly. Here then, is a small selection of recent interviews with musicians who have comfortably disclosed more than the usual talking points:

Wreckless Eric best known for penning the iconic Whole Wide World, spent over three hours offering up his well-considered opinions on almost everything, from religion to The Rolling StonesSir Mix-A-Lot, the man who revealed in the early 90’s to the MTV generation how much he liked Big Butts, has proven many times, through his dialogue with Norman B, that he has strong, and sometimes surprising views on everything, from racism to gay marriage. The sadly departed, Ian McLagan enthusiastically chatted with Norman B about not only his early days with the Small Faces, but also the break up of the Faces, touring with The Stones and the importance of a muse in his life. Ian McLagan and Norman B had attended the same art school in London, so the two silver-haired Englishmen had a connection that went way back to make the interview even more poignant after Ian died. Back in late 1979, Norman B was the first DJ in America to play the unique Turn to Red EP by Killing JokeFrom that moment on he became an ardent fan of the band. So it was only natural that many years later, Martin Glover, bassist and founding member of Killing Joke, was invited for a lengthy chat. Glover also known as Youth, has gone on to make his mark as a much sought-after producer. In the in-depth conversation with Norman B he talks about the future of music, what he enjoys listening to and offers advice on making a career in the entertainment business. Canadian singer-songwriter-poet, Barzin caught Norman B’s attention with his emotive and beautiful music. The shy, humble musician talks about his influences and explains how he comes up with the hypnotic music he creatively produces. Multi-talented drummer, producer, author and entrepreneur Martin Atkins is one of rock’s legendary drummers, his stellar resume includes playing with PiLBrian BrainMinistryPigfaceKilling Joke and Nine Inch Nails. He is an engaging raconteur, but Norman B was able to take the interview to where Martin’s real-life anecdotes lay bare, the rarely-heard thoughts of a major rock star.

Life Elsewhere airs:
Sundays at 12 noon ET at The Source WMNF HD3  

Mondays at 7.00pm ET at WROM Radio
Mondays at 5.00pm PT at NWCZ Radio

Life Changing Music

Music That Changed My LifeIn the latest edition of Life Elsewhere, Norman B looks back at the music that changed his life. He tells of buying his first album at Woolworths, not knowing anything about the music. He was captivated by the brooding Greek-god like visage on the cover. It was the Memphis FlashElvis Presley. From there Norman discovered the Blues and  Elmore James which led to the new R & B sounds coming out of the USA, including early Tamla Motown and  Marvin Gaye. It was no coincidence that fledgling London bands were also being inspired by the same music. The Rolling Stones being no exception, fronted at that time by Blues aficionado and masterful musician, Brian JonesVan Morrison with his R & B and Irish Show-band roots were all but absent when he released his landmark album, Astral Weeks, a momentous life-changing release, says Norman B. Reggae has been another important part of Mr. B’s life and he cites  Cornell Campbell and Gregory Isaacs as fine examples. The consistently adventurous music of David Bowie is included in the story as are the The Smiths, The Only Ones are acknowledged for their timeless ode to addiction and  Killing Joke with their formidable melding of rock, dub and even metal in their debut release. A.R. Kane, remain still relatively unknown but their music caused Norman B to reevaluate his thinking in some areas. Finally, Canadian musician and poet Barzin is singled out because his beguiling lyrics and enchanting arrangements signify another change in life and a new way forward.

Also in the program our regular contributor on film and media Bob Ross, pays tribute to a unique, genius performer, Robin Williams. Plus the Hit That Never Was features a high-school friend of Norman B, the legendary virtuoso guitar player and singer-songwriter, Peter Green.

Life Elsewhere air every Monday at 9.00am EST (1400 GMT)

WMNF 88.5fm

streaming: www.wmnf.org

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